Lisinopril (Zestril®, Prinivil®, Qbrelis®)

Overview

Lisinopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure.  It acts by inhibiting the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, lowering serum levels of the vasopressor hormone angiotenin II.  Decreased angiotensin II receptor stimulation also decreases adrenal secretion of aldosterone. 

In addition to its vasodilatory effects, lisinopril has demonstrated protective benefits in preventing cardiac remodeling associated with progressive congestive heart failure, and improving survival in patients experiencing acute myocardial infarction.  The mechanism for these effects is not completely understood, but is thought to involve decreasing myocardial oxygen demand via afterload reduction and decreased aldosterone-mediated pathologic cardiac remodeling.

Lisinopril commonly causes a “bradykinin cough”, and in rare occasions can be associated with an anaphylaxis-like reaction or angioedema of the head, neck, or intestine.

In Plain English

Lisinopril stops your body from making a blood pressure-raising hormone.  This lowers your blood pressure and relieves stress on heart muscle if you have heart failure.

Clinical Considerations

lisinopril

Figure 1. Lisinopril clinical considerations at a glance

 

Evidence Basis

 

Lisinopril In the News

 

Citations

  1. Wishart DS, Feunang YD, Guo AC, Lo EJ, Marcu A, Grant JR, Sajed T, Johnson D, Li C, Sayeeda Z, Assempour N, Iynkkaran I, Liu Y, Maciejewski A, Gale N, Wilson A, Chin L, Cummings R, Le D, Pon A, Knox C, Wilson M. DrugBank 5.0: a major update to the DrugBank database for 2018. Nucleic Acids Res. 2017 Nov 8. doi: 10.1093/nar/gkx1037
  2. Epocrates Rx Online [Internet database]. San Mateo (CA): Epocrates, Inc. 2003. Retrieved at mobile.epocrates.com. Web-based; continuous content updates. Accessed 2018 May 14.
  3. “Prescription Prices, Coupons & Pharmacy Information – GoodRx.” Prescription Prices, Coupons & Pharmacy Information – GoodRxhttp://www.goodrx.com
  4. “DailyMed.” U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/.

 

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